Reconnecting grizzly bear groups

Reconnecting grizzly bear groups

When the Yellowstone to Yukon vision emerged in 1993 we all knew one of the biggest and most urgent tasks was to reconnect the isolated grizzly bear population in Yellowstone with its cousins to the north.  This was not simply necessary for grizzly bears, which would otherwise risk being lost locally, or extirpated*, from the region but for other wildlife…

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Why are grizzly bears called umbrella species?

Why are grizzly bears called umbrella species?

Grizzly bears are often used as an umbrella species. Their need for large wild spaces where they are secure from threats such as roads and development means that when grizzly bear populations are healthy, their habitat also protects about 80 per cent of other species that live in the same region.   More than 100,000 grizzly bears once…

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Driving to common goals in Idaho’s lower Kootenai River Valley

Driving to common goals in Idaho’s lower Kootenai River Valley

In 2018, we awarded Rachel Ackerman a Sarah Baker Memorial Fund grant for her social science research in Idaho’s lower Kootenai River Valley. We caught up with her to learn more about her forward-thinking plan.  The Kootenai River is huge, impressive, and vital to people and wildlife in the basin who rely on its water….

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Exploring “questions worth asking” in Canada’s north

Exploring “questions worth asking” in Canada’s north

In 2018, we awarded Kirsten Reid a Sarah Baker Memorial Fund grant for her ambitious project in one of the wildest places on Earth — northern Canada’s Greater Mackenzie Mountains. Reid is a PhD student in the Department of Geography at Memorial University of Newfoundland. We caught up with her to learn more about her…

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Your chance to research wolverines

Your chance to research wolverines

Project to study habitat needs of the elusive mammals Do you plan on spending some time in the Rockies or mountain ranges of southeastern British Columbia in the coming months? You can take part in wolverine research. Y2Y is partnering on an exciting project this winter with Wolverine Watch, a scientific collaboration of researchers from B.C….

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Shrinking landscapes: Why Y2Y works to prevent islands of wildlife

As one of the last intact mountain regions in the world, whose current network of protected lands supports healthy wildlife populations, the Yellowstone to Yukon region is a refuge for these important animals. Conserving this region is critical for the long-term survival of all wild creatures.

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