Media resources - Yellowstone to Yukon Conservation Initiative

Earth Day is every day. Y2Y is connecting and protecting nature for a healthier planet. You can help.

Media Resources

If you are a member of the news media looking for an interview, background information, photos or b-roll, please contact Kelly Zenkewich (communications and digital engagement manager) via email: kelly (at) y2y (dot) net or phone: 1-403-609-2666 x 126.

For general information requests, please email info (at) y2y (dot) net or call our main number at 1-800-966-7920.

Find an Expert

Y2Y’s staff are experienced, effective and enthusiastic science communicators who appear frequently on camera, radio and in print media.

With numerous scientists on the staff and board who are available to discuss large landscape conservation; human-wildlife coexistence; environmental assessment; forestry; wildlife species including wolverines, mountain caribou and grizzly bears; wildlife migration and more, we are happy to help journalists, writers and producers with stories and background research.

As seen in

Y2Y is proud to have our work and staff featured in many publications, films, television shows and media, including:

Fast Facts

Formed in 1993, Yellowstone to Yukon Conservation Initiative (Y2Y®) is a collaborative effort with both U.S. and Canadian not-for-profit organizations that collectively connect and protect habitat from Yellowstone to the Yukon so people and nature can thrive.

The organization is based in Canmore, Alberta, Canada. Staff and program work is distributed across five American states (Washington, Oregon, Idaho, Montana and Wyoming), two Canadian provinces (British Columbia and Alberta), two Canadian territories (Yukon and Northwest Territories) and at least 75 Indigenous territories.

Publications

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If you require a logo style or format not listed below, please email your request to kelly (at) y2y (dot) net.

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FAQs

  • The Y2Y vision was founded in 1993 in Alberta, Canada.
  • More than 20 staff work in five American states, two Canadian provinces, two Canadian territories, and the territories of at least 75 Indigenous groups, with our head office in Canmore, Alberta.
  • Read our history to learn more
  • Our mission is to connect and protect habitat from Yellowstone to Yukon so people and nature can thrive.
  • Our approach to conservation relies on science, activism and collaboration.
  • Since 1993 we have worked with more than 735  partners, including scientists, conservation groups, landowners, government agencies, Indigenous governments and communities, and businesses to progress our mission.
  • The Yellowstone to Yukon region stretches 2100 miles (3400 km) from south of Yellowstone National Park to Yukon in Canada’s north.  See maps and read more about the region.
  • This is one of the few remaining large mountain areas of connected habitat left on Earth.
  • It is home to the full suite of wildlife species since the ice age ended.
  • The region’s narrowest point is British Columbia’s (B.C.) Peace River area.
  • Water from this region sustains millions of people across western North America.
  • Home to two major zones where grizzly bears are known to cross the U.S.-Canada border: Crown of the Continent ecosystem (Montana-Alberta) and the Cabinet-Purcell Mountain Corridor (Idaho-B.C.)
  • The reason we work on such a large landscape is because wildlife show us this is what they need to succeed.
  • Due to the unique scale of our work many other organizations across North America and on other continents have been inspired to do similar work including Algonquin to Adirondacks Collaborative (A2A) and Baja to Bering Strait (B2B), a marine environment conservation initiative.

Explore our map to learn more about this diverse, dynamic region.

Access the shapefiles on Databasin for research and mapping:

Latest News and Media Releases

Global cause for connection

Wildlife crossing structures help an array of species get where they need to go safely. Learn more about a handful of the crossings that are out there, and how a growing number of crossing structures in the Yellowstone to Yukon region are a leading force in the global cause for connection.