Wildlife’s need to roam: The story of Pluie the wolf

Wildlife’s need to roam: The story of Pluie the wolf

Thinking on the scale nature needs In the early 1990s, radio collars, satellite transmitters and GPS technology revealed a pattern of long-distance animal movements previously unknown to biologists.  Between 1991 and 1993, Pluie, a wolf radio-collared in southern Alberta, covered an area 10 times the size of Yellowstone National Park and 15 times that of Banff…

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Living peacefully with grizzly bears

If you’ve ever spotted a grizzly bear in the wild, you’d never forget that feeling — equal parts excitement, fear, respect and sheer awe.  Throughout the Yellowstone to Yukon region, grizzlies hold a special status, as a carnivore at the top of the food chain and in our collective psyche as an icon of wilderness….

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North America’s greatest conservation opportunity

This map, published by scientists in 2004, shows the extent to which the ranges of 14 large mammal species have shrunk over the past 200 years and where they remain. As western North America was settled and human activities came to dominate the region, the amount of available wildlife habitat shrank dramatically.   The Yellowstone to…

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What are those little bags hanging from the pine tree?

What are those little bags hanging from the pine tree?

The area of Montana between Yellowstone National Park and the northwest mountains in Montana is called the High Divide Linkage Zone. Wildlife use the High Divide Linkage Zone to access habitat across their range. One of these species is the grizzly bear. Along their travels grizzly bears find food from various sources — including the…

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