Since 1998, Y2Y has invested in grassroots organizations and other groups through our annual Y2Y Partner Grants Program. 

These on-the-ground projects complement the efforts of Y2Y, and mobilize work that we wouldn’t be able to do on our own.

In 2019, Y2Y funded 14 projects totaling $59,000. Please review the full suite of 2019 Partner Grant recipients below.  

Apply for the 2020 grant cycle now

The Yellowstone to Yukon Conservation Initiative is pleased to announce that its Partner Grants program has been extended to its 22nd year.

For more information on the request for proposals, application process and grant requirements, please access the following documents:

Completed applications should be submitted to Ellen McKay at ellen (at) y2y (dot) net by midnight MST, Feb. 28, 2020. You will receive an e-mail acknowledging receipt of your application.

Timelines for the 2020 grant cycle are:

Application deadline: Midnight MST, Feb. 28, 2020
Notification of decisions:Mar. 27, 2020
Deadline for reporting:Nov. 30, 2020

The Y2Y Partner Grants program is made possible through the generous support of the Woodcock Foundation. Y2Y also thanks those individuals who choose to direct their personal donations to the Partner Grants program.

Current Y2Y partner grant recipients:  

The Yellowstone to Yukon Conservation Initiative is pleased to announce the 2019 Y2Y Partner Grant recipients.

In 2019 alone, we invested over $60,500 in the following 18 organizations that will help protect and connect the habitat from Yellowstone to Yukon so people and nature can thrive.

Anthony Pavkovich
Traversing Yellowstone’s High Country: Skiing Through Changing Climate – $5,000

British Columbia Conservation Foundation
Wildlife Collision Prevention Program – $2,000

Carnivore Coexistence, UW-Madison; Wolf Awareness
Carnivores & Communities Co-Flourishing Program; A Range Rider Pilot – 5,000

Cube Iron – Cataract Coalition
Support for CICC Map and Banquet – $1,000

Glacier-Two Medicine Alliance
The Badger-Two Medicine Permanent Protection Campaign – 2,000

Jackson Hole Wildlife Foundation
Tetons Western Slope Corridor Connectivity Project – $3,000

Nature Conservancy of Canada – Alberta Region
Jim Prentice Wildlife Corridor – $5,000

People and Carnivores
Keeping Bears and People Safe in Rural Montana Communities – $3,000

Province of British Columbia – Forests, Lands, Natural Resource Operations and Rural Development
Quantifying Rates and Mechanisms of Grizzly Bear Mortality in the Elk Valley – $4,000

Sinopah Wildlife Research Associates
Why Did The Bear Cross the Road? A Wildlife Connectivity Education Initiative – $5,000

Tom Miner Basin Association
Conflict Reduction Practices and Range Riding Program – $3,000

Townsite of Redwood Meadows
Redwood Meadows Wildsmart Program – $5,000

Trans-border Grizzly Bear Project
Grizzly Bear Connectivity & Coexistence Through Conflict Reduction – $4,000

Valhalla Wilderness Society
Fish-Bear Lakes Western Toad Ecology and Highway 31A Wildlife Corridor Mortality – $3,000

Wildsight – Creston Valley Branch
Creston Valley Green Map Phase 2 – $2,000

WildWise Yukon – Centre for Human-Wildlife Conflict Solutions
Mapping Human-Bear Conflict in Yukon Communities – $2,000

Winter Wildlands Alliance
21st Century Approaches to Collaboration and Management: Wolverine & Winter Recreation – $3,000

Yukon Conservation Society
YCS Community Presentations on Mines and Resource Roads – $3,500

Previous partner grant recipients

In 2018 Yellowstone to Yukon Conservation Initiative invested over $59,000 in the following 14 organizations that will help protect and connect the habitat from Yellowstone to Yukon so people and nature can thrive.

Bear Conflict Solutions Institute
Living with Wildlife 2.0 – Social Media Launch Strategy and Implementation – $3,000

Blackfeet Tribe Bison Program
The Iinnii Initiative: Surveying Landowners to Understand the Potential for Conflict with Wild, Free-ranging Buffalo in the Crown of the Continent – $4,000

Centre for Human-Wildlife Conflict Solutions (WildWise Yukon)
Reducing Human-Bear Conflict in Yukon Communities – $4,000

CPAWS Southern Alberta Chapter
Envisioning a Better Way Forward: Engaging Albertans in Forest Management – $3,000

Eastern Oregon Legacy Lands Fund
Big Wild in the Blues – $4,000

National Museum of Wildlife Art
Wildlife Migration Exhibit – $10,000

People and Carnivores
Keeping Bears out of Garbage—From Canisters to Whole Communities – $4,000

Tom Miner Basin Association
Proactive Methods for Reducing Livestock Loss Due to Predation by Wolves and Grizzly Bears – $4,000

Valhalla Wilderness Society
Fish-Bear Lakes Western Toad Ecology and Highway 31A Wildlife Corridor Mortality Mitigation Study – $5,000

Waterton Biosphere Reserve
Supporting Coexistence of Large Carnivores and People in Southwestern Alberta – $3,000

Whitefish Legacy Partners
Close the Loop – Protect Smith Lake Forever – $3,000

Wildsight – Creston Valley Branch
Creston Valley Green Corridor Mapping – $5,000

Yaak Valley Forest Council
Pacific Northwest Trail Relocation Campaign – $3,000

Yukon Conservation Society
Yukon Wetlands Protection: Summit and Public Event – $4,000

In 2017 Yellowstone to Yukon Conservation Initiative invested over $50,000 in the following 13 organizations that will help protect and connect the habitat from Yellowstone to Yukon so people and nature can thrive.

Braided River
Weaving People and Nature Together – $2,000

Canadian Parks and Wilderness Society – SAB
Engagement and Planning for Landscape Health in Southern Alberta – $5,000 

EcoFlight
Strategic Overflights for Landscape Connectivity – $5,000

Fireweed Creative
Y2Y Documentary Film – $5,000 

Fraser Headwaters Alliance
Goat River Trail Upgrade and Promotion – $5,000

Glacier-Two Medicine Alliance
Badger-Two Medicine Permanent Protection Plan Campaign – $5,000 

Hells Canyon Preservation Council
Greater Hells Canyon Wild Connections – $5,000

Lower Kootenay Band
Branch 18 Creek Restoration – $5,000 

Peace Valley Environment Association
Site C Campaign – $1,750

People and Carnivores
Bear Poles in the Backcountry: A Win for Humans and Grizzlies – $5,000 

Sierra Club BC
Site C Campaign – $1,750

University of Northern British Columbia (UNBC)
Future Scenario Modeling in the Peace River Break – $3,500

West Kootenay Ecosociety
The Status of Old Growth Management in the Inland Temperate Rainforest of B.C. – $2,000 

In 2016 Yellowstone to Yukon Conservation Initiative invested $48,000 in the following 15 organizations that will help protect and connect the habitat from Yellowstone to Yukon so people and nature can thrive.

Bear Conflict Solutions
Living with Wildlife in the Bow Valley- Documentary, Digital Narrative, ShortsVideo Series – $3,000

GTC Cultural Heritage Division (Gwich’in Social and Cultural Institute)
Wind River Booklet – $3,000

Hells Canyon Preservation Council
HCPC’s Wild Connections – $3,000

Lincoln County Environmental Health Department
Lincoln County Solid Waste Collection Sites – $3,000

Montana State University Gallatin County Extension – Natural Resource Program
Big Sky Conservation Partnership – $3500

Northern Wetbelt Working Group
Documenting the Northern Wetbelt and Promoting its Conservation – $3000

Raptor View Research Institute
Rogers Pass Raptor Site Development Project – $3,000

Road Watch in the Pass
Helping Animals Cross Highway 3 Safely – $3,000

Tom Miner Basin Association
Range Rider and Conflict Prevention Program – $3,000

Valhalla Wilderness Society
Fish-Bear Lakes Western Toad Ecology and Highway 31A Mortality Mitigation Study – $2,500

Valley Advocates for Responsible Development
Protecting Wildlife Corridors from Development – $3,500

Waterton Biosphere Reserve Association
Supporting Coexistence of Large Carnivores and People in Southwestern Alberta – $4,000

WCS Wildlife Conservation Society Canada
Protecting and Connecting the Bighorn Backcountry in Alberta – $4,000

West Kootenay EcoSociety
Selkirk/Purcell Conservation Action Plan – $2,000

Yukon Conservation Society and Canadian Parks & Wilderness Society – Yukon Chapter
Public Campaign to Protect Yukon’s Peel Watershed – $5,000

In 2015 Yellowstone to Yukon Conservation Initiative invested $50,000 in the following 15 projects that will help protect and connect the habitat from Yellowstone to Yukon so people and nature can thrive.

British Columbia Conservation Foundation
Wildlife Collision Prevention Program, $3,000

Craighead Institute

Promoting wildlife connectivity across the Madison Valley, Montana, $4,000

Friends of Scotchman Peaks Wilderness
General Support for FSPW Education and Outreach, $3,000

Future West
Keeping the Gates Open for Wildlife in the Madison Valley, $3,000

Great Bear Foundation of Montana
Bears & Apples, $3,000

Great Divide Trail Association
2015 Aldridge Creek Trail Maintenance Trip, $1,000

Greater Yellowstone Coalition
Teton County Wildlife Crossings, $3,000

Hells Canyon Preservation Council
HCPC’s Wild Connections, $3,000

Keystone Conservation
Carnivore Coexistence on the Northern Rocky Front, $3,000

Selkirk Conservation Alliance
Grizzly Bear Sanitation and Outreach. Sullivan Lake Campgrounds, $3,000

Sierra Club of British Columbia Foundation
Saving the Peace River Valley, Stopping the Site C Dam, $4,000

People’s Way Partnership
Communicating the Ecological Effectiveness of Highway Wildlife Crossings on US 93 North in Montana, $4,000

Waterton Biosphere Reserve
Supporting Coexistence of Large Carnivores and People in Southwestern Alberta, $5,000

WildWise Yukon
Reducing Bear-Human Conflict in Southern Yukon, $3,000

Yukon Conservation Society and Canadian Parks and Wilderness Society – Yukon Chapter
Public Campaign to protect Yukon’s Peel watershed, $5,000

In 2014 Yellowstone to Yukon Conservation Initiative invested $60,000 in the following 17 organizations that will help protect and connect the habitat from Yellowstone to Yukon so people and nature can thrive.

Citizens for the Wyoming Range
Wyoming Range Oil and Gas Leasing Opposition Campaign, $3,500

Friends of Scotchman Peaks Wilderness
General Support for FSPW Education and Outreach, $3,000

Glacier-Two Medicine Alliance
Support for Permanent Glacier-Two Medicine Protection Project Coordinator, $4,300

Jackson Hole Conservation Alliance
Wild Neighborhoods, $3,000

Keystone Conservation
Livestock Management for Carnivore Conservation and Habitat, $3,000

Montana State University – Gallatin County Extension
Whitebark Pine Education and Management – Big Sky, Montana, $3,000

People and Carnivores
Grizzly Bear Connectivity in the High Divide, $3,700

People’s Way Partnership
Educational materials – Communicating the Ecological Effectiveness of Highway Wildlife Crossings on US 93 North in Montana, $3,000

Yaak Valley Forest Council
Advancing Watersheds, Wildlife, and Wilderness, $3,000

Canadian Parks and Wilderness Society – Southern Alberta Chapter
Outreach in Southern Alberta to Protect the Castle Special Place, $3,000

Castle-Crown Wilderness Coalition
Reaching Out to Protect the Castle Special Place, $4,000

Skeena Watershed Conservation Coalition
Sacred Headwaters, $9,500

Waterton Biosphere Reserve Association
Supporting Coexistence of Large Carnivores and People in Southwestern Alberta, $5,000

Wildsight – Invermere Branch
Protecting the Purcells with our Hearts and Minds, $3,000

Road Watch in the Pass
Reducing Vehicle-Wildlife Collisions on Highway 3, $4,000

Yukon Conservation Society and Canadian Parks and Wilderness Society
Yukon Peel Watershed Legal Defense, $4,000

In 2013 Yellowstone to Yukon Conservation Initiative invested $60,000 in the following 17 organizations that will help protect and connect the habitat from Yellowstone to Yukon so people and nature can thrive.

$3,500 – Center for Large Landscape Conservation
To identify wildlife corridors that are important to regional-scale connectivity in the High Divide, and highlight which of these are threatened by current land use and future landscape changes.

$3,000 – Canadian Parks and Wilderness Society – Southern Alberta
To help advance efforts to gain protection of the Castle Special Place in the South Saskatchewan Regional Land Use Plan.

$2,500 – Craighead Institute
To evaluate the effects of the proposed Three Sisters Mountain Village, in Canmore, Alberta on wildlife connectivity.

$2,500 – Flathead Lakers
To support stewardship efforts along the Flathead River to protect the river corridor and critical lands, which are important nesting habitat and migratory areas for birds and native fish as well as wildlife habitat.

$3,000 – Future West
To support public relations efforts that highlight the ecological significance of the High Divide in an effort to increase the quantity and quality of on-the-ground community-based conservation and restoration efforts in the area.

$4,000 – Great Bear Foundation
To continue the “Bears & Apples” program, part of a larger scheme of educational programs and on-the-ground conservation activities that engage and inform the public about ecological/environmental issues, through the lens of bear conservation.

$3,500 – Greater Yellowstone Coalition
To support efforts that ensure climate sensitive species, such as grizzlies and wolverines, as well as habitats of Greater Yellowstone have the best chance possible to adapt to changing climates and enhance connectivity.

$4,000 – Gwich’in Social and Cultural Institute
To build awareness about the importance of the Peel Watershed and the Wind River by producing a map book of traditional Gwich’in place names, oral history, and ecological knowledge of the area.

$3,000 – Hells Canyon Preservation Council
To protect and restore key wildlife movement corridors and crucial core habitats in the greater Hells Canyon region, and to engage citizens in the data collection process to nurture human connections with this wild treasure.

$5,500 – Jackson Hole Conservation Alliance
To support Wild Neighborhoods, an outreach and educational program, that encourages Teton residents and local businesses to use best-practice guidelines to reduce conflict with wildlife and the risk of wildfire.

$4,000 – Jackson Hole Wildlife Foundation
To support the modification of existing fences that act as a barrier to wildlife movement in the Greater Yellowstone Ecosystem.

$5,000 – Lincoln County, Montana
To obtain baseline data on grizzly bear population in the Cabinet-Yaak Ecosystem and evaluate the linkage of these populations with other nearby populations.

$4,000 – Montana Fish, Wildlife & Parks Foundation
To reduce the risk of food-conditioned bears, which leads to human-caused grizzly bear mortalities, in the Cabinet-Yaak Ecosystem by providing residents with safe and convenient garbage collection transfer sites and free access to electric fencing.

$3,500 – People and Carnivores
To support the expansion of bear-safe food container, including 20 foot ‘bear poles’ and bear-resistant containers for backcountry outfitters, in Beaverhead-Deerlodge National Forest.

$4,500 – Road Watch in the Pass
To educate decision makers and citizens about wildlife issues and solutions along Alberta/British Columbia’s Highway 3, in an effort to advance the implementation of effective wildlife crossings on the Highway, and enhance wildlife connectivity.

$3,250 – Selkirk Conservation Alliance
To reduce human/bear conflicts by installing additional bear-proof food storage lockers within the Idaho’s State Parks within the Selkirk grizzly bear ecosystem.

$2,000 – Wildlands CPR
To enhance efforts to improve wildlife habitat, connectivity and forest resiliency by monitoring the effectiveness of Legacy Road reclamation projects.

$5,000 – Castle-Crown Wilderness Coalition
To help advance efforts toward the environmental protection of the Castle Wilderness as a viable wilderness within  the Crown of the Continent ecosystem.

$2,500 – Driftwood Foundation
To map the movements of what is thought to be the world’s largest lambing herd of Stone’s sheep, which lives on Todagin Mountain in northern British Columbia, and whose habitat is threatened by mining.

$3,500 – Friends of Scotchman Peaks Wilderness
To help conduct education, outreach and stewardship activities to preserve the rugged, scenic and biologically diverse 88,000 acre Scotchman Peaks Roadless Area.

$4,000 – Great Bear Foundation
To continue the “Bears & Apples” program, part of a larger scheme of educational programs and on-the-ground conservation activities that engage and inform the public about ecological/environmental issues, through the lens of bear conservation.

$4,250 – Greater Yellowstone Coalition
In support of the “Living with Wildlife” program that seeks to reduce conflicts with wildlife, particularly bears, in areas that have traditionally been problematic for the population and have limited dispersal into new habitats.

$2,500 – Gwich’in Social and Cultural Institute
To document, digitize, maintain, and use Gwich’in traditional ecological knowledge and Gwich’in traditional use for regulatory and research purposes.

$4,500 – Headwaters Montana
In support of Headwaters Montana’s project to maintain and restore the ecological integrity of the Transboundary Flathead region in the Crown of the Continent.

$4,000 – Keystone Conservation
To create and support the unique Bear Spray Rental Program in Jackson and Cody, Wyoming.

$6,500 – Peace Valley Environment Association
To continue the grassroots campaign against the construction of the Site C dam on the Peace River in British Columbia.

$2,500 – People’s Way Partnership
To assist in the project of communicating the ecological effectiveness of wildlife crossings on US Highway 93 North in Montana.

$5,000 – Sierra Club of BC Foundation
In support of the Sierra Club’s efforts to raise public awareness and campaign against the proposed Site C mega project.

$4,000 – Selkirk Conservation Alliance
To assist in the purchase and install of up to 12 ‘bear-proof’ food storage lockers within the State Parks within the Selkirk grizzly bear ecosystem.

$4,500 – Trumpeter Swan Society
In support of the Trumpeter Swan Society’s efforts to bring NGO, landowner and agency partners together to establish a multi-year effort that will repair past damage to wetlands in the Centennial Valley that are important to the Trumpeter Swan.

$3,500 – Yaak Valley Forest Council
To assist the Headwaters Partnership to work cooperatively with the local community and Kootenai National Forest to restore aquatic habitats in the Yaak River watershed.

Header photo: Climbers in Yukon, Pat Morrow