Coexisting with wildlife in Montana’s Tom Miner Basin

Coexisting with wildlife in Montana’s Tom Miner Basin

Thanks to the Tom Miner Basin Association, people and nature are thriving together in a Montana valley that’s both agriculturally productive and teeming with wildlife.  Easily living up to its namesake, Montana’s Paradise Valley offers a little something for everyone.  At the northern edge of Yellowstone, America’s first and most iconic national park, the valley…

Read More
How do wildlife know to use animal bridges?

How do wildlife know to use animal bridges?

Ever wonder if animals really use those bridges to cross highways? They do! And not just because they’re following signs. Fencing and over- or underpasses together help wildlife stay safe.   Grizzly bears There is a “learning curve” for animals to begin using wildlife crossings. For wary animals like grizzly bears and wolves, it may take…

Read More
The home of wildlife crossings: Banff, Alberta

The home of wildlife crossings: Banff, Alberta

Banff National Park in Alberta, Canada is the world’s longest and most consistent effort to monitor wildlife use of highway crossing structures.  The busy Trans-Canada Highway cuts east-west across the park, making it difficult for wildlife to travel north-south through the Rocky Mountains. When the highway was upgraded in the 1980’s from a single two-lane…

Read More
Wild Ways: Corridors of Life

Wild Ways: Corridors of Life

Directed by filmmaker James Brundige, Wild Ways puts a spotlight on Y2Y and other conservation groups working to re-assemble a fragmented planet.

Read More
Why Y2Y?

Why Y2Y?

Y2Y’s big-picture approach aims to remedy genetic isolation and the loss of habitat, as well as enable wildlife and vegetation to adapt to the environment’s most pressing issue — climate change.

Read More
Wildlife’s need to roam: The story of Pluie the wolf

Wildlife’s need to roam: The story of Pluie the wolf

In the early 1990s, radio collars, satellite transmitters and GPS technology revealed a pattern of long-distance animal movements previously unknown to biologists.  Between 1991 and 1993, Pluie, a wolf radio-collared in southern Alberta, covered an area 10 times the size of Yellowstone National Park and 15 times that of Banff National Park.  Other animals such as…

Read More

Living peacefully with grizzly bears

If you’ve ever spotted a grizzly bear in the wild, you’d never forget that feeling — equal parts excitement, fear, respect and sheer awe.  Throughout the Yellowstone to Yukon region, grizzlies hold a special status, as a carnivore at the top of the food chain and in our collective psyche as an icon of wilderness….

Read More

North America’s greatest conservation opportunity

This map, published by scientists in 2004, shows the extent to which the ranges of 14 large mammal species have shrunk over the past 200 years and where they remain. As western North America was settled and human activities came to dominate the region, the amount of available wildlife habitat shrank dramatically.   The Yellowstone to…

Read More