Hiking in the Yukon. Image: Pat Morrow
Top actions | ... | ...

Sign Up For Email News Updates

Be the first to know about news, events and successes.

"I BELIEVE in connected landscapes; so connected that my children can walk from one point to another."
Chris Bunting, Y2Y Supporter since 2007

Read More

Stop the Site C Dam!

Canada's federal government has the power to stop the Site C dam. Find out how you can help make that happen!

Opposition to the Site C dam on Treaty 8 territory in B.C. is growing every day, as more and more people learn how the project will infringe First Nations treaty rights, destroy productive agricultural land and harm fish and wildlife.

Energy from Site C isn't even needed for domestic use, but instead would power oil and gas development. Taxpayers will pay for decades for this $9-billion-plus dam, while lower-cost, truly clean energy development is neglected.

Yet here's the response from Ottawa: "No comment, this is before the courts." Don't let them get away with this non-answer. The federal government can stop granting permits for work on Site C, but they need pressure.

Will You Help?

The most important action you can take right now is contact your Member of Parliament, especially if you set up a face-to-face meeting, while MP's are in their ridings May 23-27.

We are here to help you! Check out the tools and information at RealSiteCHearings.org. If you can't do a meeting, phone calls are also very effective.

TAKE ACTION!

The federal government has promised a new era of reconciliation with First Nations, environmental protection, food security and transition to clean energy. Site C threatens all these promises, and telling our MPs about this is critically important.

Thank you for connecting with your Member of Parliament!

Remember, we're here to help. If you want to set up a meeting with your MP, please feel free to contact Candace Batycki, Y2Y's B.C. and Yukon Program Director, at .

The Peace River Valley is far too ecologically and culturally important to be devastated by an outdated hydro dam. Photo: Garth Lenz.
Let us know what you think. Submit Feedback