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Grizzly bear delisting in Greater Yellowstone Ecosystem

Y2Y reiterates its position focused on connecting and protecting habitat throughout the Yellowstone to Yukon region so that both people and nature can thrive.

MEDIA STATEMENT
June 23, 2017

Following Thursday's announcement that the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service will remove Yellowstone grizzly bears from protection under the Endangered Species Act, Yellowstone to Yukon Conservation Initiative (Y2Y) reiterates its position focused on connecting and protecting habitat throughout the Yellowstone to Yukon region so that both people and nature can thrive.

Y2Y celebrates more than 30 years of grizzly bear recovery in Yellowstone and surrounding areas as a step forward in grizzly bear conservation.

However, “The long-term well-being of grizzly bear populations in the Greater Yellowstone Ecosystem ultimately hinges on reconnecting this small and currently isolated population to other populations further north in the trans-border Crown of the Continent region,” says Dr. Jodi Hilty, president and chief scientist at Y2Y.

As such Y2Y will deepen our efforts to protect and restore current and potential grizzly bear core habitat throughout the region, and facilitate of movement via wildlife corridors to ensure healthy, connected populations over the long term.

Working with partners on the ground, Y2Y will continue to engage in a variety of ways, including but not limited to:

  • Acquiring important core and corridor habitat for grizzlies — by raising capital for private land acquisition and advocating to increase targeted public land protections;
  • Conducting and using the best available science to prioritize action on the ground;
  • Decreasing human-wildlife conflict by ensuring safe road crossings, promoting co-existence between landowners and wildlife, and engaging with local communities;
  • Restoring core grizzly bear habitat by identifying key locales and working with land managers to ensure appropriate activities in areas that are critical for grizzly bear needs and connectivity.

In short, Y2Y will continue to ensure the entire Yellowstone to Yukon region has a connected and thriving grizzly bear population.

For further comment please contact:

Kelly Zenkewich, communications coordinator at Yellowstone to Yukon Conservation Initiative, or 403-609-2666 ext. 112