Hiking in the Yukon. Image: Pat Morrow
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Discover Idaho's backcountry wildlife

Go behind the scenes with Lacy Robinson, Cabinet-Purcell project co-ordinator, and wildlife photographer David Moskowitz to find out what it's like to set up wildlife cameras in Idaho's backcountry.

Go behind the scenes with Lacy Robinson, Cabinet-Purcell project co-ordinator, and wildlife photographer David Moskowitz to find out what it's like to set up wildlife cameras in Idaho's backcountry.

David has been tracking wildlife and photographing different animals throughout the Yellowstone to Yukon region for a number of years.

Recently he spent some time with Lacy setting up cameras in a remote region of north Idaho, near to the border with British Columbia. This area is known as the Cabinet-Purcell mountain corridor and it serves an important linkage role, connecting the Central Canadian Rocky Mountains, Crown of the Continent and the Salmon-Selway-Bitterroot regions. 

David says his main motivation is to highlight these animals and bring them out of the "shadows of wilderness," to a larger audience. 

"Really where the rubber meets the road with conservation in the 21st century is thinking on a landscape level, thinking on an ecosystem level," he says.

"Animals that cover large home ranges depend on intact ecosystems for their survival. So when we see a wolverine or a lynx or other rare carnivores with large home range we're not just seeing an individual animal they are kind of a manifestation of a functional ecosystem." 

According to David, in order for these animals to survive  and thrive  the entire ecosystem must be cared for.

Information gathered from these cameras helps us better understand wildlife connectivity. See who shows up for their portrait session.

Video by Scott Rulander