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Wild Ways: Saving Wildlife with Protected Corridors

Wild Ways: Saving Wildlife with Protected Corridors
Join us for clips from NOVA's acclaimed film, Wild Ways: Saving Wildlife with Protected Corridors, followed by a panel discussion featuring Filmmaker James Brundige, Y2Y's Dr. Jodi Hilty, Y2Y Co-Founder Harvey Locke, and moderated by NOVA Senior Executive Producer Paula S. Apsell.
  • Wild Ways: Saving Wildlife with Protected Corridors
  • 2016-10-24T19:00:00-04:00
  • 2016-10-24T21:00:00-04:00
  • Join us for clips from NOVA's acclaimed film, Wild Ways: Saving Wildlife with Protected Corridors, followed by a panel discussion featuring Filmmaker James Brundige, Y2Y's Dr. Jodi Hilty, Y2Y Co-Founder Harvey Locke, and moderated by NOVA Senior Executive Producer Paula S. Apsell.
When
Oct 24, 2016 from 07:00 PM to 09:00 PM (US/Eastern / UTC-400)
Where
WGBH Studios, 1 Guest St, Brighton, MA
Web
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WGBH and the Yellowstone to Yukon Conservation Initiative (Y2Y) invite you to a forum discussing new approaches to conserving biodiversity in a time of climate change. Join us for clips from NOVA's acclaimed film, Wild Ways: Saving Wildlife with Protected Corridors, followed by a panel discussion featuring Filmmaker James Brundige, President & Chief Scientist of Yellowstone to Yukon Dr. Jodi Hilty, Yellowstone to Yukon Co-Founder Harvey Locke, and moderated by NOVA Senior Executive Producer Paula S. Apsell. A reception will follow the preview and discussion.

About Wild Ways:
As highways and other man-made obstacles threaten large mammals' breeding and migratory patterns, NOVA explores in stunning cinematography how conservation biologists are undertaking efforts to link together existing wildlife refuges with tunnels, overpasses and protected land corridors to preserve some of the world's most beloved species. These "connectivity conservation" methods offer hope for elephants, antelope, lions, bears, and other species to sustain healthy populations over time.

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