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The Hidden Life of the Forest | Nelson, B.C.

The Hidden Life of the Forest | Nelson, B.C.
Join Dr. Suzanne Simard, Mount Willet Wilderness Forever and Yellowstone to Yukon Conservation Initiative for an enlightening conversation about conservation.
When
May 16, 2018 from 07:00 PM to 09:00 PM (Canada/Pacific / UTC-700)
Where
Nelson United Church, 602 Silica St, Nelson, BC V1L 4N1
Web
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Join Mt. Willet Wilderness Forever and Yellowstone to Yukon Conservation Initiative for an evening presentation from Dr. Suzanne Simard on the Douglas-fir trees that grow in the inland rainforests of British Columbia.

Learn how these trees are neither particularly alone nor even silent, exchanging non-stop information, nutrients and water in a shared network. The trees warn each other of various dangers and recognize their relatives.

These underground processes enable natural forests to behave with intelligence and wisdom, supporting resilience to natural disturbances and stresses like logging and climate change.

Q&A to follow, admission is by donation. RSVP now for your ticket.

The Hidden Life of the Forest:

The Douglas-fir trees that grow in the inland rainforests of British Columbia grow up to 20 or 40 metres or more – depending on how the land lays – solitary, silent gentle giants that sift out the rays of the sun.

These trees, it turns out, are neither particularly alone nor even silent. Underneath our feet, the trees are exchanging non-stop information, nutrients and water in a shared network that an editor of Nature journal named the “wood wide web”.

Through this network, trees in natural forests communicate with each other underground via thin fungal threads called mycelia, which form a symbiosis with trees’ root tips, forming an immense underground network. Via this network the trees warn each other of various dangers and recognize their relatives.

This research provides a vivid example of how the below ground web enables natural forests to behave with intelligence and wisdom, enabling resilience to natural disturbances and stresses like logging and climate change.

About Suzanne Simard

Suzanne Simard, Ph.D., is professor of forest ecology in the department of forest and conservation sciences at the University of British Columbia.

Dr. Simard is a groundbreaking researcher who studies the astonishing complexity and symbiotic relationships in forest and other ecosystems, especially the underground fungal networks that connect trees and permit them to share nutrients and information.

Her research, recently highlighted in the international bestseller by German forester Peter Wohlleben, The Hidden Life of Trees: What They Feel, How They Communicate — Discoveries from a Secret World, has shown beyond doubt that forests are in fact communities with highly complex and adaptive networks centered around what she calls “hub” or “mother” trees.

Suzanne’s work has far-reaching implications about how to be wise stewards not only of forests, but wetlands, tundra, grasslands and alpine ecosystems as well. In revealing how these networks look a lot like human neural and social networks, her discoveries show us that if our species intends to survive, we had best seek to learn about how to live in balance in the biosphere from the webs of plant and fungal life that have been here far, far longer than we have and know far more than we do about resilience for the long haul.

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