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"I BELIEVE in connected landscapes; so connected that my children can walk from one point to another."
Chris Bunting, Y2Y Supporter since 2007

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Connectivity for Carnivores in the Bow Valley

Connectivity for Carnivores in the Bow Valley
Connectivity for Carnivores in the Bow Valley
Free talk in the Bow Valley Naturalists' 2015/16 speaker series will take place on Tuesday November 24, at 7:30 pm in the Banff Seniors Centre in Banff, Alberta. Dr. Adam T. Ford will present "Connectivity for Carnivores in the Bow Valley".
  • Connectivity for Carnivores in the Bow Valley
  • 2015-11-24T19:30:00-07:00
  • 2015-11-24T21:30:00-07:00
  • Free talk in the Bow Valley Naturalists' 2015/16 speaker series will take place on Tuesday November 24, at 7:30 pm in the Banff Seniors Centre in Banff, Alberta. Dr. Adam T. Ford will present "Connectivity for Carnivores in the Bow Valley".
When
Nov 24, 2015 from 07:30 PM to 09:30 PM (Canada/Mountain / UTC-700)
Where
Banff Seniors Centre, 107 Bear Street, Banff, AB
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The second free talk in the Bow Valley Naturalists' 2015/16 speaker series  will take place on Tuesday November 24, at 7:30 pm in the Banff Seniors Centre in Banff, Alberta. Dr. Adam T. Ford will present "Connectivity for Carnivores in the Bow Valley".  

Adam cut his teeth doing wildlife research in 2001 working on bat habitat on Vancouver Island, and began work in the Bow Valley with Dr.Tony Clevenger in 2007 on wildlife underpasses and overpasses. He has since gone on to win multiple academic awards and scholarships and is widely published in scientific journals. Adam’s research career is highlighted by work on several threatened or endangered species in a variety of biomes, from burrowing owls in the semi-arid grasslands of southeastern Alberta, bison in northeastern Alberta, grizzly bears in Banff National Park, and more recently, African wild dogs in the ranchlands of Kenya. 

Based in Calgary, Adam currently is a Liber Ero Fellow in Conservation Science at the University of Guelph. The Liber Ero Postdoctoral program supports scientists early in their careers who are looking at real life conservation management issues that are time sensitive. Adam partnered with the Yellowstone to Yukon Initiative (Y2Y) and Parks Canada to pull together decades of animal movement data collected across the Rockies to answer the question: what makes a good wildlife corridor? This is a particularly hot and timely topic given the impending Smith Creek Area Structure Plan for the eastern end of the Three Sisters property and ongoing controversy around proposed development at the mouth of the wildlife underpass at Deadman's Flats.   All are invited to learn more about Adam's work-in-progress. 

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